Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Online Information
 About Us
 ADD/ADHD News
 ADD/ADHD Books
 ADDerwards
 Creative ADDers
 Donate
 Events
 GO Games
 Information
 Links
 Natural Remedies
 Research
 Resources
 Support Groups
 Whats New


ADHD SOFTWARE
FREE DVD or CD


FREE DVD or CD

ADD/ADHD Online Information


ADD/ADHD Information

Employment Issues

Help for Disabled People

Specialist Services for Disabled People

What help is available to me if I have a disability and I'm looking for work?

Most disabled people who use Jobcentre Plus are helped into work by Jobcentre Plus or Jobcentre personal advisers. In the 12 months between April 2002 and March 2003 they supported 112,731 disabled people to find work. If your disability or health condition isn't causing you particular difficulties in finding or keeping a job, a Jobcentre Plus or Jobcentre personal Adviser will be able to give you appropriate advice and guidance.

What if I'm recently disabled or my disability is causing additional difficulties in finding or keeping a job?

Disability Employment Advisers (also called DEAs) provide specialist support to people who are recently disabled, or those whose disability or health condition has deteriorated and who need employment advice.

They provide support to disabled people who are having difficulty in getting a job because of their disability, and also to employed people who are concerned about losing their job because of a disability.

Access to Work (AtW) Advisers have specialist knowledge of the Access to Work programme which provides support to disabled people and their employers to help overcome work related obstacles resulting from a disability What kind of help can a DEA offer?

DEAs can provide a range of support, advice and information including:

Employment Assessment, which can help you find out how your disability or health condition affects the type of work or training you want to do
referral to a period of Work Preparation , which is an individually tailored programme designed to help disabled people, or those with health conditions, return to work following a long period of sickness or unemployment
job seeking advice and support
training advice and information
advice and information on keeping your job
information on the Job Introduction Scheme which pays a grant to your employer for the first few weeks in a job, helping to pay towards wages or other employment costs
information on WORKSTEP which provides supported job opportunities for disabled people facing more complex employment barriers
information on the Disability Symbol which enables employers to show their commitment to the employment , training, retention and career development of disabled people,
details of the New Deal for Disabled People to help sick or disabled people on health related benefits who want to work, find work. It is voluntary and you decide whether or not you want to join it.

What kind of help can an AtW Adviser offer?

In-depth information on the Access to Work programme including advice which can help disabled people and their employers overcome work related obstacles resulting from disability
an assessment of your needs and whether Access to Work is appropriate for you
details of the grant that may be available, through the Jobcentre Plus, towards any extra employment costs which result from disability

How can I make an appointment with a DEA or AtW Adviser?

Contact your Jobcentre Plus office or Jobcentre to make an appointment with a DEA.
Your local Jobcentre Plus office, or Access to Work Business Centre can put you in contact with an Access to Work Adviser.

Access to Work

What is Access to Work?

Access to Work (AtW) provides advice and practical support to disabled people and their employers to help overcome work related obstacles resulting from a disability.

How does it do this?

As well as giving advice and information to disabled people and employers, AtW pays a grant, through Jobcentre Plus, towards any extra employment costs that result from a disability.

Am I eligible for help through Access to Work?

If your disability or health condition affects the type of work you do, and it is likely to last for 12 months or longer, contact your nearest AtW Business Centre to check whether you are eligible for AtW.

If you have a disability and are in a job, about to start in a job, or are self- employed, AtW could also be for you. It applies to any paid job, part-time or full-time, permanent or temporary.

Unemployed or employed disabled people needing help with a communicator at a job interview can also get help through AtW.

What type of help can be provided through Access to Work?

AtW can help in a number of ways. For example, it can help pay for:

communicator support at interview (CSI) which meets the full cost of hiring an interpreter to remove barriers to communication at interview;
a support worker, which allows the applicant to use the services of a helper. Types of support might include reading to a visually impaired person, communicating for a hearing impaired person via sign language (other than at interview which is covered by CSI), providing specialist coaching for a person with learning difficulties or helping a person with care needs;
special aids and equipment to help a disabled person function in the work place;
adaptations to premises or to existing equipment;
help with the additional costs of travel to work, or in work for people who are unable to use public transport. How are my particular needs assessed?

The AtW Adviser will normally speak to you and your employer to arrive at the most effective solution. In the majority of cases, this can be done over the telephone, however, a visit can be arranged if necessary. Sometimes specialist or technical advice may be needed, which the AtW Adviser will help arrange.

How long will it take to get the help I need?

We aim to get you the help that you need in the shortest possible time. However, if it's likely to take some time, the AtW Adviser will explore temporary alternatives with you, for example a support worker or reader, while the permanent solution is arranged and delivered.

Who will obtain the help I need?

It's usually your employer (or you if you are self-employed) who will arrange to obtain the agreed support and then claim back the grant from AtW.

How much is my Access to Work grant?

AtW pays a percentage of the total cost of approved support depending on how long you have been in employment, what support is needed, or whether you are self-employed, for example:

Access to Work pays up to 100% of the approved costs for -

unemployed people starting a job;
all self-employed people; and
people, working for an employer, who have been in the job for less than 6 weeks

Whatever the employment status of the applicant, Access to Work pays up to 100% of the approved costs of help with -

support workers;
fares to work; and
communicator support at interview.

For people, working for an employer, who have been in the job for 6 weeks or more and need special equipment or adaptations to premises, AtW pays a proportion of the costs of support, as follows.

Approved Cost Maximum Access to work contribution
Less than 300 Nil
Between 300 and 10,000 80% of the cost over 300
Over 10,000 80% of the cost between 300 and 10,000 and 100% of the cost over 10,000

All help is for a maximum period of 3 years after which the AtW Business Centre will review the support and the circumstances. Access to Work may provide help for a further period if you continue to be eligible for help under the rules that then apply.

How do I apply for Access to Work?

You will need to contact your nearest AtW Business Centre. Staff there will tell you more about AtW and how it could help your place of work. Speak to your local JobCentre Plus Office

http://www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/cms.asp?Page=/Home/Customers/HelpForDisabledPeople/AccesstoWork

Employment Assessment

What is an employment assessment?

An employment assessment can help you find out how your disability or health condition affects the type of work or training you want to do. It can also help you identify your abilities and strengths. At the end of an assessment you'll have an action plan of steps you need to take to achieve your job goal.

What does an Employment Assessment involve?

You'll have an in depth interview with the Disability Employment Adviser (DEA) in your Jobcentre Plus office or Jobcentre and may be referred to a Work Psychologist for a further assessment of your employment needs. The DEA and Work Psychologist can provide specialist support to help disabled people get or keep employment.

At the interview you'll be able to talk about your abilities, any previous work experience you may have, and agree what might be the most suitable job for you.

As part of the assessment you may also be asked to carry out some practical tasks or written work. These tasks will be similar to ones done in different types of work.

How long does an employment assessment last?

It depends on your individual needs and may take half a day or longer. The DEA will discuss the length of your assessment with you.

What happens after my employment assessment?

You and your DEA will discuss your assessment and agree on an action plan to help you achieve your job goals. Part of your action plan may include Work Preparation or training.

Will Employment Assessment affect my benefits?

An employment assessment does not affect your benefits and you'll be able to claim travel expenses. How do I arrange to have an employment assessment?

Contact your Jobcentre Plus office or Jobcentre. They will be able to give you details of the Disability Employment Advisor nearest to where you live.

REMPLOY Ltd

What is Remploy?

Remploy is the largest employer of disabled people in the UK and is the largest single provider of WORKSTEP within Jobcentre Plus. Remploy is also a provider of New Deal for Disabled People. Remploy was first established in 1946 to provide work for disabled ex-servicemen. Today it employs around 9,000 disabled people - approximately 5,500 are based in a network of 81 factory locations across England, Scotland and Wales, and over 3,500 are in jobs with mainstream host employers, supported through Remploy's Interwork scheme.

What is Remploy's purpose?

Remploy is an executive Non Departmental Public Body and operates as a commercial company. Its aim is: 'To expand opportunities for disabled people in sustainable employment within Remploy and the communities it serves.' Remploy has two main functions'. Remploy factories and Remploy Interwork. The factory sites exist to provide meaningful employment for disabled people who are seeking work through the provision of quality goods and services. The aim of Remploy Interwork is to place disabled people into supported jobs in mainstream companies alongside non-disabled people. Remploy's Interwork mission statement is: 'To develop employment opportunities for people with disabilities by working in partnership with others.'

How is Remploy funded?

Remploy is funded through revenue generated from its commercial activities and grant in aid from Government. Remploy receives an annual grant of from the Government to provide training, development and employment opportunities for disabled people. In 2003-04 the grant was set at 115 million. Through its modernisation strategy 'Remploy 21' aims to diversify and strengthen the services it provides to people with disabilities.

Who is eligible for WORKSTEP?

WORKSTEP should only be considered once it has been identified that other programmes cannot meet the needs of an individual. Advice and information on the range of programmes available to disabled people can be obtained from the local Jobcentre Plus Office. The aim of WORKSTEP is to provide support in Jobs for people with disabilities who have more complex barriers to finding and keeping work, but who, with the right support, are able to make a valuable contribution in their job and where appropriate, develop and progress to open employment.

What are NDDP Job Broker Services?

New Deal for Disabled People (NDDP) was launched on 2 July 2001. It is a voluntary initiative delivered through a network of Job Brokers (who may be public, private or voluntary sector organisations, including Jobcentre Plus). It aims to support and test innovative ways of helping people on incapacity benefits move out of economic inactivity and into lasting employment. Remploy has been contracted to deliver NDDP Job Broker Services throughout Scotland, North West England, East Midlands and South and West Yorkshire.

Who is eligible for NDDP?

Qualifying benefits include: Incapacity Benefit; (IB) - including Severe Disablement Allowance (SDA), or; National Insurance (NI) Credits on the grounds of incapacity (which may be awarded on their own or in addition to payments of income related benefits - Income support (IS), Housing Benefit (HB), Council Tax Benefit (CTB) - or War Pensions (WP).

How are people referred to Remploy?

Disabled people are mainly recruited to Remploy via a Disability Employment Advisor (DEA) based in the Jobcentre Plus Office. The DEA will assess the individual's eligibility for the WORKSTEP programme. If it is identified that Remploy can offer the individual the type of work they are looking for, then the adviser may contact Remploy on the individual's behalf. Since 1 October 2002 Remploy have also been authorised to undertake their own eligibility assessments in some instances.

What else can Remploy offer Individuals?

A growing number of Remploy sites now have Learning Centres in addition to providing development opportunities where employees have access to on and off site training, coaching and work experience. The Learning Centres offer:

basic skills courses, for example; numeracy, literacy and keyboarding skills often in conjunction with local colleges.

The administration of NVQs (although not available at all the sites). Internet access, learning packages and interactive CD ROMs'. 'Jobclubs', which offer advice on how to draft CVs, letters and search for vacancies. They are also aimed at increasing the confidence of individuals, for example; offering helpful tips and advice on interview techniques.

http://www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/cms.asp?Page=/Home/Customers/HelpForDisabledPeople/Remploy

WORKSTEP

What is WORKSTEP?

WORKSTEP provides job support to over 21,000 disabled people who face more complex barriers to getting and keeping a job, but who can work effectively with the right support. It enables eligible disabled people to realise their full potential to work within a commercial environment, giving them, whenever possible, an opportunity to progress into open employment. The programme also offers practical assistance to employers.

Is WORKSTEP suitable for me?

If you have a disability and wish to have a job where you can:
develop your skills;
have the opportunity to develop and progress; and
have the right kind of support when you need it.

then you may benefit from finding out more about WORKSTEP

What type of work is offered?

WORKSTEP can be in almost any type of job. It provides support to you and your employer that is tailored to your individual needs. It gives you the opportunity to work in a variety of different jobs through a wide range of organisations from small high street shops to national companies.

What will I be paid?

You will get the same wage as non-disabled colleagues doing the same or similar work.

Will I have any support?

The WORKSTEP provider will introduce you to your manager and colleagues at work and keep in touch to make sure everything is going smoothly. You will be able to agree a development plan with your WORKSTEP provider and your employer. This will make sure you have the necessary training and support to learn to do your job, and develop in it.

How do I find out if I'm eligible for WORKSTEP?

Contact your Jobcentre Plus office or Jobcentre and they will put you in touch with a Disability Employment Adviser who will tell you whether you are eligible for WORKSTEP and help you decide whether it is right for you.

http://www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/cms.asp?Page=/Home/Customers/HelpForDisabledPeople/WORKSTEP

Job Introduction Scheme

What is the Job Introduction Scheme?

The Job Introduction Scheme (JIS) can help you if you are looking for work, or are about to start a job and have a disability that may affect the kind of work you will do.

How does it help?

It's not always easy to be sure if a particular job or work environment will suit you because of your disability. You are keen to do the job, but may have some practical concerns about your disability that make you hesitant to accept a job. JIS can help with these concerns by paying a weekly grant to your employer for the first few weeks that you are employed in the job to help towards your wages or other employment costs, for example additional training.

Will I be able to apply for JIS?

If you are about to start a job and you, or your employer, have genuine concerns about your ability to manage this particular job because of your disability, you should ask your Disability Employment Adviser (DEA) whether JIS would be available in these circumstances.

When should my employer apply for the JIS grant?

JIS must be applied for before you start your job.

Does JIS apply to any job?

The job can be full or part time, but must be expected to last for at least 6 months after the JIS grant ends. It must be a genuine job and not specifically created to take advantage of JIS.
JIS cannot be used for jobs with Government Agencies or Departments, for jobs in WORKSTEP or a New Deal job for which the New Deal subsidy is being paid.

How much does JIS pay?

JIS pays a weekly grant of 75 to the employer for the first 6 weeks that you are employed. In exceptional circumstances, and after agreement with the DEA, this may be extended to 13 weeks.

How much do I get paid while using JIS?

Your employer will pay you the normal rate for the job.

Can I tell potential employers about JIS?

Yes, though you should discuss this with your Disability Employment Adviser first as it is their decision whether JIS will be paid for a particular job.

How do I apply for JIS?

You, or your employer, should contact your local Jobcentre Plus office or Jobcentre. They can give you details of the Disability Employment Adviser nearest to where you live.

Remember, JIS must be applied for before you start your job

http://www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/cms.asp?Page=/Home/Customers/HelpForDisabledPeople/JobIntroductionScheme

Work Preparation

What is Work Preparation?


It's an individually tailored programme designed to help people with health conditions or a disability return to work following a long period of sickness or unemployment. It can also help people who are at risk of losing their job because of their disability by helping them to overcome difficulties that are affecting their work.

Work Preparation aims to help you overcome obstacles that are preventing you from finding suitable employment.

Work Preparation can help you by:-

helping you identify the type of work most suitable for you
providing work experience in a work environment
learning new skills or updating old skills
building your confidence

How long will it last?

It may last for a few days or weeks depending on your specific needs and you can attend part time or full time. You can discuss this with your Disability Employment Adviser (DEA) in your employment assessment before starting Work Preparation.

Where will it be held?

Work Preparation programmes are run on behalf of Jobcentre Plus by organisations (usually called providers) These providers have the skills and experience to help you prepare for work. The programme may be held at the Provider's premises in your local area or in the workplace with a local employer.

Will I have to live away from home to do Work Preparation?

Work Preparation will usually be local to your home area but may be residential depending on your needs.
Residential programmes for people with visual impairments are also available.

Will it affect my benefits?

You may be able to stay on your existing benefits or claim an allowance. Your DEA will discuss this with you during your employment assessment. You will be able to claim travel expenses.

What happens at the end of my Work Preparation programme?

The Work Preparation provider completes a final report and a copy is given to you and your DEA. An appointment is then made with your DEA so that you can discuss how you got on and the recommendations in the final report. You'll then agree an action plan for the future which may include looking for work, training or further education.

How can I find out more about whether Work Preparation is suitable for me?

Contact your Jobcentre Plus office or Jobcentre to make an appointment with the DEA. They will be able to discuss your particular needs regarding Work Preparation.

http://www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/cms.asp?Page=/Home/Customers/HelpForDisabledPeople/WorkPreparation

Disability Symbol

What is the Disability Symbol?


Its a recognition given by Jobcentre Plus to employers who have agreed to take action to meet five commitments regarding the employment, retention, training and career development of disabled employees.

How is the symbol relevant to me as a jobseeker or employee?

There are around 5,200 employers all over the country who use the disability symbol. They range from small to very large organisations in all different types of business. Symbol using employers make five commitments regarding the employment, retention, training and career development of disabled people.

What commitments do employers make?

Employers who use the symbol have agreed with Jobcentre Plus that they will take action on these five commitments:

to interview all disabled applicants who meet the minimum criteria for a job vacancy and consider them on their
abilities
to ensure there is a mechanism in place to discuss, at any time, but at least once a year, with disabled employees what can be done to make sure they can develop and use their abilities
to make every effort when employees become disabled to make sure they stay in employment
to take action to ensure that all employees develop the appropriate level of disability awareness needed to make these commitments work
each year, to review the five commitments and what has been achieved, plan ways to improve on them and let employees and Jobcentre Plus know about progress and future plans.

How will I recognise the Disability Symbol?

The Disability Symbol (displayed above) is a circular symbol, usually green, with two ticks.

What does it mean if I see the Disability Symbol on a job advert?

It means the employer will guarantee to interview you if you meet the minimum criteria for that job. Find out from the employer what the minimum criteria are. That way, you'll have a good idea of whether it's worth applying and what to expect.

Where else might I see the Disability Symbol?

You might see it in the vacancy section of a newspaper, or on a vacancy displayed on a Jobpoint, or on application forms or papers sent to you by an employer.

What if I'm already employed by a symbol user?

This means you'll have the opportunity to say if you feel that more can be done to develop you to enable you to use your abilities fully. The guaranteed interview promise also applies to internal vacancies advertised within your organisation, provided that you meet the minimum criteria for the job.

What happens if I become disabled or there are changes to my disability whilst working for my employer?

If this should happen and there are aspects of your present employment which make it difficult for you to carry on in the same work, as a symbol user your employer will do all they can to make sure you can stay in a job.

How does the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) affect disability symbol using employers?

Symbol using employers are covered by the DDA in the same way as other employers. The action that they take as a symbol user is in addition to any obligations placed on them by the Act, and in no way affects your rights as a disabled person under this Act. Contact:

Disability Rights Commission Helpline, Freepost MID02164, Stratford-upon-Avon,CV37 9BR
Telephone 08457 622633
Textphone 08457 622644
Faxback 08457 622611

Where can I get a list of employers who are Symbol users?

A list of national and local symbol users is available from your Disability Employment Adviser (DEA). You can contact the DEA through your local Jobcentre or Jobcentre Plus office.

http://www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/cms.asp?Page=/Home/Customers/HelpForDisabledPeople/DisabilitySymbol

New Deal for Disabled People

What is New Deal for Disabled People?


New Deal for Disabled People (NDDP) aims to help people on disability and health related benefits move into and retain paid work through a network of Job Brokers. It is entirely voluntary so you can decide whether or not to participate.

Who is eligible for it?

People who are getting one or more of the following benefits for themselves can get help from the New Deal for Disabled People:

Incapacity Benefit
Severe Disablement Allowance
Income Support including a Disability Premium
Income Support because we have stopped your Incapacity Benefit and you are appealing against the decision.
Disability Living Allowance. You must not be in paid work of 16 hours a week or more, or getting Jobseekers Allowance.
Housing Benefit including a Disability Premium. You must not be in paid work of 16 hours a week or more, or getting Jobseekers Allowance.
Council Tax Benefit Including a Disability Premium. You must not be in paid work of 16 hours a week or more, or getting Jobseekers Aloowance.
War Pension with an Unemployability Supplement
Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit with an Unemployability Supplement.
National Insurance credits because of sickness or disability. You may get these on their own or with Income Support, Housing Benefit, Council Tax Benefit or War Pensions.
Equivalent benefits to Incapacity Benefit being imported into Great Britain under European Community Regulations on the co-ordination of social security and the terms of the European Economic area Agreement.

How can NDDP help me?

A range of different organisations run New Deal for Disabled People Job Broker services throughout England, Scotland and Wales. You will be able to choose the Job Broker you want to work with in your local authority area and you are free to contact them directly.

Job Brokers can give you : advice about how to get a job; help with matching your skills and abilities to what employers need and support on starting work.

Job Broker services can include support with completing application forms and writing C.Vs, interview preparation and advice on vacancies available locally. They also work closely with providers of training and other provision where the customers need additional help.

How can I find out about Job Brokers in my area?

To find out about your local Job Broker you can: contact the NDDP Helpline on 0800 137177 or 0800 435550 for textphone users access the website: www.newdeal.gov.uk/nddp visit your Jobcentre Plus office or Jobcentre or Social Security office.

http://www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/cms.asp?Page=/Home/Customers/HelpForDisabledPeople/NewDeal

Frequently Asked Questions About Services For Disabled People

Listed below are examples of questions most frequently asked about services for disabled people. Although examples of answers are supplied, if you have any additional queries or concerns, or your particular question isn't covered here, contact the Disability Employment Adviser (DEA) at your Jobcentre Plus office or Jobcentre.

Q. I have a disability and I'm having difficulty finding work. Where can I get some help?
A. Contact your Jobcentre Plus or Jobcentre and ask to make an appointment with the Disability Employment Adviser (DEA). The DEA can discuss your employment situation with you and agree the most appropriate type of support to assist you into employment.

Q. Are there any Tax Credits for disabled people?
A. From April 2003 two new tax credits, a Child Tax Credit and a Working Tax Credit were introduced to replace the existing tax credits: Working Families' Tax Credit, Disabled Person's Tax Credit and the Children's Tax Credit. Both of these new credits are administrated by and claimed from the Inland Revenue. The Child Tax Credit (CTC) replaces the child-related payments in Working Families' Tax Credit, Disabled Person's Tax Credit, the Children's Tax Credit, Income Support and income-based Jobseeker's Allowance. The Working Tax Credit (WTC) is a tax credit to top up the earnings of working people and broadly replaces the adult support within Working Families' Tax Credit, Disabled Person's Tax Credit and the New Deal 50plus Employment Credit, and extends some support to adults without children or a disability. It continues to include help with the costs of childcare.

Q. Who can claim Working Tax Credit?
A. You can claim working Tax Credit if:
You are aged 16 or over, and
You work at least 16 hours a week, and
You and your partner are responsible for a child or young person, or
You have a disability which puts you at a disadvantage in getting a job, or
You or your partner are aged 50 or more and are returning to work after a spell on qualifying out-of-work benefits.

If you do not have children or a disability that puts you at a disadvantage in getting a job, you can also claim Working Tax Credit if:
You are aged 25 or over and
You work at least 30 hours a week.
The Working Tax Credit is available to self-employed people and employees. For more information, telephone:
Tax Credits Helpline Number: 0845 3003900
Textphone for people with hearing or speech impairment: 0845 3003909

Q. I'm an employed disabled person and I'm concerned about losing my job because of the effects of my disability on the work I do. Who can give me advice about keeping my job?
A. Contact the Disability Employment Adviser (DEA) at your Jobcentre Plus office or Jobcentre. The DEA can give practical advice to you (and your employer if appropriate) on job redesign and adjustments within the workplace. The DEA may also suggest a period of Work Preparation to help overcome the difficulties that are affecting your work.

Q. Should I declare my disability to an employer when applying for jobs?
A. Under the Disability Discrimination Act it is unlawful for employers to discriminate against disabled people in their recruitment and selection procedures. Whilst it isn't unlawful to ask questions about health or disability on an application form, or to issue a separate health questionnaire, it is unlawful to use the responses in a discriminatory way. Discuss this with a Disability Employment Adviser. They will be able to give advice on the best way to explain your suitability for a job and stress your abilities in any job applications you make.

Q. I've been offered a job but my future employer and I are concerned about whether it's the right one for me. Is there any type of help available?
A. If you or your employer have concerns about whether the job is the right one for you, find out about the Job Introduction Scheme (JIS) from the DEA at your Jobcentre Plus office or Jobcentre. JIS pays a grant of 75 a week to the employer for the first 6 weeks of your employment to assist with employment and training costs. JIS must be applied for before you start the job.

Q. I have a disability, how can the Access to Work programme help me?
A. If your disability or health condition is likely to last for 12 months or longer and it affects the type of work you do (including self employment), you may be eligible for some practical help in the workplace. Contact your DEA, who can put you in touch with an AtW Adviser.

Q. I am about to start a training course but need special equipment to help me cope. Can Access to Work help?
A. AtW is available for people in or about to start paid employment. Talk to the training provider about what help they are able to provide during your training.

Q. If the Access to Work programme is providing me with equipment in the workplace, how long will I have to wait for it?
A. The aim is to get you the help you need in the shortest possible time. If it's likely to take some time, temporary alternative solutions can be explored by the AtW Adviser, together with you and your employer.

Q. I have a disability and I've heard about WORKSTEP. How will I know if it's suitable for me?
A. The DEA in your Jobcentre Plus office or Jobcentre can tell you more about WORKSTEP which is for disabled people who are facing more complex employment barriers because of their disability.

Q. I've heard about the Remploy Interwork Scheme. How is it relevant to me?
A. Interwork is a three way partnership between an employer, a disabled person and Remploy. Remploy works closely with the individual ensuring they receive the correct support in order to ensure they can secure employment within the open market. They may receive assistance with recruitment, training, job search and job clubs, job coaching etc. Remploy also works closely with employers in order to ensure our clients are able to gain employment in a wide variety of industrial sectors and occupational roles. To find out more about Remploy, visit their website at www.remploy.co.uk or you can phone them on 02476 515800.



Q. Do the Disability Service web pages have any links to disability organisations and other websites?
A. Through the main Jobcentre Plus webpages, we are linked to a number of sites including: RNIB, RNID, Department for Work and Pensions and Learning and Workbank websites. Our WORKSTEP pages are also linked to the Remploy webpages. Although we are not directly linked to a large number of websites, you can link with a wide range of disability organisations by visiting the Disability Rights Commission website at www.drc-gb.org

http://www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/cms.asp?Page=/Home/Customers/HelpForDisabledPeople/FrequentlyAskedQuestions

adders.org 2004



Back to Information


Home  About Us  ADD/ADHD News  ADDerwards  Advertising  Books  Contact Us  Creative ADDers  Donate

 Events  Forums  Information  Links  Natural Remedies  ADDers.org News  Research  Resources  Search adders.org

 Site Map  Social Stories  Sponsor Events  Student/Researchers  Support Groups  Supporters




Join us on.... Twitter Twitter Facebook Facebook

Home


sbobetpk.net. bohemian-chandeliers.ch

Attention Deficit Disorder Online Information


ADHD SOFTWARE
FREE DVD or CD


FREE DVD or CD

Share |